Change is immortal

Standard

You’ve heard it before. When you find yourself grumbling about something in your life which is not quite going the way you’d like to someone will always happily chirp in to say “Change is the only constant in life” or “this too, shall pass”. I deliberately choose to leave out a description of what I do for a living in the ‘About’ section – and no, it’s not because I am running some illegal underground trade selling stolen Dior handbags, but for the most part, I’d like to keep those two things, the profession and the personal side of things separate in its own neat little box.

But yesterday I ran across the quote which appears as today’s blog title while researching on the next generation of Change Management. And I just have to have it as the title to my entry, because it rolls so deliciously on my tongue and sounds seriously profound that it makes me want to run to the closest tattoo shop and have it inked in cursive around my wrist. Lest I ever forget that every bit about life right now is bound to change in some form or another.

One of things that I love about yoga is the (no-pun intended) flexibility that enables one to tailor a sequence to suit his/her current need. With the exception of the sun salutation which consist of a fixed series of repetitive movements, all other asanas can be build and weaved together to aid a certain injury you may be experiencing, to provide emotional relief at a difficult period of your life or to specifically target those jelly arms because you have had one too many pineapple tarts during the festive season.

One of my favorite balancing pose: the tree pose helps keep bones strong

As women, we are bound to go through cycles of changes that will affect us both physically and biologically. This is not to say that men are spared from the crazy cycle of change that is called life but pregnancy and hormonal fluctuations put women’s bodies through more stress as it naturally adapts to accommodate these changes.

Recently when I ran across the following article (“A Woman’s Lifeline“) it became clear to me that I need to constantly alter and tweak my (almost) daily practice to suit my current need at that given time. And who knew, certain asanas are best for certain ages because it may address situations that you tend to experience most during that period of time.

Thus, as the German philosopher,  Arthur Schopenhauer once said “Change alone, is eternal, perpetual, immortal”. Everything is bound to change as we grow into ourselves, and continue to paint our own canvas of life. It is only fitting that we too learn to adapt our fitness regime to complement and support these different transitions.

Advertisements

2 responses »

    • Coming from someone who writes with such humor and gusto..well you had me at’ beautifully’. You just made my day! 🙂 I’m going to keep smiling for the rest of the day because of it.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s